Underwater volcanoes: danger at sea bed

Most of the known volcanoes are on the earth’s surface, but to the surprise of many there are several underwater volcanoes that are active.


Submerged coloss

The Marsili is the largest underground volcano in Europe and has never been seen because it is completely below water. It is located 150 km from Lombardo the hometown of Virgil and the astronomer Giordano Bruno who died at the stake in 1600.

The immense underwater mountain has a height of 3000 meters. It has obviously shown quite a lot of activity so the scientific community is quite concerned.

The Morro Rock located in California is a famous tourist attraction that was discovered in 1542 by Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo a Portuguese sailor who worked for the Spanish crown who managed to observe a nose that protruded several meters but years later it was the subject of study and it could be concluded that it was an underground volcano that is currently active.

On the exotic Santorini Island located in Greece is the Kolumbo that recorded a strong eruption in 1628 that devours much of the island today still active and is monitored by volcanologists to avoid possible catastrophes such as the one that occurred previously.

The volcano of Molokini Island in Hawaii registers no activity but is a tourist destination quite desired by diving lovers as it has coral reefs and great wealth of flora and fauna.

The volcanoes of the Tongan archipelago in West Polynesia in Oceania are located in distributed in the more than 170 islands that make up this archipelago which is one of the most volcanicly active areas in the world because it is very close to the border between tectonic plates that connect Australia to the Pacific.

Recent studies have shown the existence of a huge volcano in Sydney that rises 700 metres above the surface of the water it was also concluded that only 250 km from the Australian capital about 50 million years ago there was a stock of volcanoes.

Underwater volcanoes: danger at sea bed
Source: curiosities  
August 14, 2019


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